There are a number of “causes” that unfairly get blamed for causing or contributing to Plantar Fasciitis. While these can certainly contribute to the problem, they may not actually cause it. Here are some of the common misconceptions when it comes to what actually causes PF.

Flat Feet Cause PF

It is true that people with flat feet are more likely to suffer from Plantar Fasciitis issues, but that’s not absolutely true. You can have excessively high arches and still suffer from PF.

Overpronating causes PF

Pronating is a fancy term that basically means your feet turn inward when you walk. It’s often connected to flat feet because as the feet turn in they tend to, over time, flatten out arch of the foot contributing to flat feet. And of course if you suffer from PF and you have flat feet, there is a chance (and maybe a good one) that you have overpronating of the feet when you walk. But just as in the previous point, it’s also possible to be suplinating (feet turning outward) and have PF.

The bottom line is that if your feet turn too inward or too outward when you walk, you might cause excessive irritation to the plantar fascia which can cause PF. But it’s certainly a my that ONLY overpronating feet cause PF.

Tight Calves Cause PF

Maybe, but there is no real agreed on definition as to what properly defines “Tight Calves.”

Proper Shoes will Cure PF

While wearing the WRONG shoes will certainly make PF worse, there is no guarantee that finding a pair of shoes that don’t exacerbate the pain will actually “heal” PF. Plantar Fasciitis takes time to properly heal and the condition certainly won’t improve when you are placing extra stress on the plantar fascia by wearing shoes that don’t have a lot of support. But again, only wearing “good shoes” won’t necessary fix the condition. Getting rid of PF can require a broad strategy where you do many things because it could be many things at the same time that contribute to PF and not one specific thing.

There is a singular Cure for PF

Just as there are many different contributing factors that can one and all cause PF, there is no one cure fits all solution. This is why it’s so darn hard to get rid of PF because what works for one person might not specifically work for another. As such you have to be willing to experiment with different potential solutions until you find one or multiple ones that work.